Yeg Honeycomb (7)
Yeg Honeycomb (7)

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Yeg Honeycomb (5)

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YEG Honeycomb manages hives at various historic locations throughout Edmonton. Sites are chosen based on their historic significance as well as their suitability for safely hosting bees. All sites are close to Edmonton's natural areas, within an 8 km radius of Edmonton's river valley, allowing the bees to pollinate local plants and promote biodiversity. Hives are visited biweekly by the project manager and project volunteers, ensuring the health and security of the bees. 

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Edmonton's City Hall is a place for civic business and a gathering place for the community to meet and celebrate. The building features two steel and glass pyramids, one 43 metres (141 ft) (ground to peak), on top of a three-storey concrete structure. One pyramid provides natural light for the main atrium, the other for the council chambers. The building also features a 60 metres (200 ft) clock Friendship Tower topped with a set of 23-carillon bells.[9] Located on the eastern edge of the financial district in Edmonton's downtown, the building is the main feature on Sir Winston Churchill Square. 

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The Alberta Aviation Museum is located in Hangar 14, one of the last remaining buildings from Edmonton’s City Centre airport at Blatchford field. Initially a farmer’s field, Blatchford Field became a cornerstone of Edmonton’s long-standing relationship with Canadian aviation. In May 1926, the city’s request to establish an airport was processed and Mayor Blatchford obtained an airport license for the field. 

The Royal Canadian Air Force built the aircraft hangar that houses the museum during the Second World War for the British Commonwealth Air Training Plan. It is the only double-long, double-wide hangar of its type left. The BCATP gathered men and women from the United Kingdom, Canada, Australia, and New Zealand to train pilots, navigators, and other aircrew to support the Allied war effort.

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The City of Edmonton has operated Old Man Creek Nursery since 1910. Currently, the nursery grows, receives, and cares for the trees, shrubs, and wildflowers that are planted by the City Operations department. This effort supports the growth and health of our urban forest canopy by providing high-quality, disease-free plant material. Annually, the nursery cares for approximately 3,000 trees, 100,000 native plants, and 3,500 shrubs. The City’s Old Man Creek Nursery is also engaged in trials to test and develop new tree species to increase the diversity of the urban forest and create a healthy and sustainable urban forest.

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Opened in 1923, as the "Provincial Mental Institute, Oliver". For many years, it was a World War I veterans’ hospital. The first 47 patients arrived in the summer of 1923, all were veterans of World War I who were mostly suffering from "shell shock," now known as Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD). Located in the northeastern portion of Edmonton, today the Alberta Hospital Edmonton is a psychiatric hospital providing care through both inpatient and outpatient programs.

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Built in 1966, Chancery Hall faces Sir Winston Churchill Square, and it neighbors the Francis Winspear Centre for Music and the Citadel Theatre to the south. It's straight lines and heavy use of concrete are examples of mid-century modernist design. Directly north are the graceful, swooping lines of the Art Gallery of Alberta. The building currently employs City of Edmonton employees.

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Fort Edmonton was the name of a series of trading posts of the Hudson's Bay Company from 1795 to 1914 all located on the North Banks of the North Saskatchewan River. The Mellon Farm house is one of the few buildings at the Fort on its original plot of land. Fort Edmonton today is nestled on 158 acres of wooded parkland along Edmonton's River Valley and began as a Canada Centennial reconstruction project in 1967.

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The Magrath Mansion was built in 1912 by developer William Magrath who, with his business partner Bidwell Holgate, aspired to develop the Highlands as an upscale neighbourhood. The Magrath Mansion was recently acquired by Concordia University and stands as an Edmonton landmark due to its size, location overlooking the river valley and its Classic Revival Architecture. Noticeable features include the two story verandah with flat roof and columns, hipped roof clad with clay tiles and multiple dormers. Magrath lived in this home until 1920 with his wife Ada and family.

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The Grierson Centre served as the North-West Mounted Police's Divisional headquarters in Edmonton upon its completion in 1912 and is associated with the development of the RCMP in the 20th century. Since 1975, the building has belonged to the Department of the Solicitor General and has been used by the Correctional Service of Canada as a halfway house for paroled prisoners and for other functions of the penitentiary service. Also located in the Grierson Centre, The Stan Daniels Healing Centre offers programs to residents to address their needs in the areas of spirituality and culture, employment, education, family relationships, and personal and emotional orientation. This Centre houses conditionally released and federally sentenced Indigenous inmates, who learn about Indigenous cultures and work with Elders.

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PAST LOCATIONS
 

Built in 1911, John B. Mercer built this warehouse to handle his growing liquor and cigar business. John Mercer constructed what the Edmonton Bulletin touted as “one of the most modern and complete cold storage plants {…] in Alberta.” Situated as it was near the railway and close to downtown businesses like Mercer’s wholesale storefront on Jasper Avenue, this building became part of Edmonton’s early warehouse district. After a major fire in 1922, destroying the two top floors,  it was reconstructed, this time with only three storeys, but with loading bays added to the north wall.  By the 1930s a matching three-storey annex was added to the south side. After almost eighty years, the building fell into disuse, has since been rehabilitated, and now provides office space for up and coming Edmonton businesses.

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